Richard Rendleman, Jr.

Richard J. Rendleman, Jr. (1949 - ) is a composer whose works have been performed by The North Carolina Symphony, The South Carolina Philharmonic Orchestra, The United States Navy Band, and a number of other orchestras, chamber groups and choral ensembles. His compositions have been recorded by the Seattle Symphony, The Warsaw National Philharmonic, The Czech National Symphony, The Slovak Radio Orchestra and the St. Stephens Chamber Orchestra. 

 

Rendleman is Professor Emeritus of Finance at the Kenan-Flagler Business School of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and has also taught at Northwestern University, Duke University, and Dartmouth College (visitor).

In 1981 Rendleman began composition studies with Robert Ward, and for the first few years thereafter composed mainly for piano.  Later, his compositions expanded into chamber, vocal and orchestral works.  Prior to studying with Ward, Rendleman's music training consisted of five years of piano lessons as a young child followed by four years of junior high and high school band.  Some of Rendleman's earliest compositions were instrumental pieces written in 1966-1967 for Rhythm and Blues band, Soul Inc., known by many in the Salisbury, North Carolina area as "Carolina's Finest Show and Dance Ensemble."

As a professor of finance, Rendleman is best known for his work in derivative securities markets, particularly implied volatility and two-state (or binomial) option pricing and for his work on the relationship between stock returns and quarterly earnings surprises. For better or worse, his work on earnings surprises in the early to mid 1980s has contributed significantly to Wall Street's sensitivity to quarterly earnings surprises.

Rendleman has also published a number of golf-related research papers, some of which have had major impact in professional golf competition, including the need to reposition Q-School as a qualifier for the Korn Ferry Tour and the need to overhaul the methodology of the World Golf Ranking System.